Everett Washington OxyContin Lawsuit

8 months 4 weeks ago #13 by Humanity
 
 
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Everett Washington OxyContin Lawsuit

 

Opioid Addiction LawsuitOn Thursday, January 19th, 2017, the city of Everett WA, filed a state lawsuit against drug maker Purdue Pharma with allegations the drug manufacturer was and continue to be a major contributing factor to opioid addiction and resultant community expenses and impact.

 

Everett city officials initiating the lawsuit on behalf of their constituents, seek to hold Purdue Pharma accountable for failing to take proactive steps in preventing OxyContin from entering the black market as an addictive drug that is commonly referenced as a major source of growing Opioid addictions across the United States.

 

The lawsuit alleges that as a result of Purdue Pharma being negligent in failing to properly institute effective controls on OxyContin, the drug was inadvertently distributed from Purdue to drug dealers, pill mills, and narcotic rings. As a result, the city of Everett has incurred substantial financial expense relating to treatment and medical care associated with OxyContin drug addiction victims.

 

Everett city officials contend that OxyContin addiction in their jurisdiction has a social impact on the community and costs taxpayers at nearly every department of local government, specifically via increase costs for treatment programs, police, incarcerations, and other city services.

 

In response, Purdue Pharma claims to have taken steps to prevent and address Oxycontin addiction which makes up 2% of all opioid prescriptions. In declaring Purdue Pharma an industry leader in opioid abuse prevention, Purdue acknowledged that it shares the nationwide concern over opioid addiction and abuse with city officials.

 

Regardless, the mayor of Everett was indifferent to Purdue Pharma excuses and stated “We are going to go at them, and we are going to go at them hard”

How hard, is yet to be seen as many legal experts consider the styling of this lawsuit to be a longshot.

 

If successful in obtaining damages from the drug maker, the city of Evertt will lay the groundwork for future litigation against drug manufacturers contributing to the opioid addiction afflicting our nation.

 

Do I Have A Lawsuit will continue to monitor developments in this case.

What Is Oxycontin?

Oxycontin is a painkiller opioid controlled release form of Oxycodone.

 

Do other drugs contain Oxycodone, if so what are they?

Other prescription drugs containing Oxycodone

  • Roxicodone

  • OxyIR

  • Percolone

  • Percocet

  • Endocet

  • Percodan

  • Endodan

  • Percodan-Demi

  • Roxiprin

  • Combunox

  • Targiniq ER

  • Troxyca ER

 

What are common side effects associated with Oxycodone:

Chills:

Chills is a feeling of coldness occurring during a high fever, but sometimes is also a common symptom which occurs alone in specific people. It occurs during fever due to the release of cytokines and prostaglandins as part of the inflammatory response, which increases the set point for body temperature in the hypothalamus. The increased set point causes the body temperature to rise (pyrexia), but also makes the patient feel cold or chills until the new set point is reached. Shivering also occurs along with chills because the patient's body produces heat during muscle contraction in a physiological attempt to increase body temperature to the new set point. When it does not accompany a high fever, it is normally a light chill. Sometimes a chill of medium power and short duration may occur during a scare, especially in scares of fear, commonly interpreted like or confused by trembling. Severe chills with violent shivering are called rigors.

 

Cold Sweats

concurrent perspiration and chill usually associated with fear, pain, or shock

 

Confusion

The term "acute mental confusion" is often used interchangeably with delirium in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems and the Medical Subject Headings publications to describe the pathology. These refer to the loss of orientation, or the ability to place oneself correctly in the world by time, location and personal identity. Mental confusion is sometimes accompanied by disordered consciousness (the loss of linear thinking) and memory loss (the ability to correctly recall previous events or learn new material.

Difficult and or labored breathing

Labored breathing is distinguished from shortness of breath or dyspnea, which is the sensation of respiratory distress rather than a physical presentation.

 

Still, many simply define dyspnea as difficulty in breathing without further specification, which may confuse it with e.g. labored breathing or tachypnea (rapid breathing). Labored breathing has occasionally been included in the definition of dyspnea as well. However, in the standard definition, these related signs may be present at the same time, but don't necessarily have to be. For instance, in respiratory arrest by a primary failure in respiratory muscles the patient, if conscious, may experience dyspnea, yet without having any labored breathing or tachypnea. The other way around, labored breathing or tachypnea can voluntarily be performed even when there is no dyspnea.

 

Lightheadedness

Lightheadedness is a common and typically unpleasant sensation of dizziness and/or a feeling that one may faint. The sensation of lightheadedness can be short-lived, prolonged, or, rarely, recurring. In addition to dizziness, the individual may feel as though his or her head is weightless. The individual may also feel as though the room is what causes the "spinning" or moving (vertigo) associated with lightheadedness. Most causes of lightheadedness are not serious and either cure themselves quickly or are easily treated.

 

Keeping a sense of balance requires the brain to process a variety of information received from the eyes, the nervous system, and the inner ears. If the brain is unable to process these signals, such as when the messages are contradictory, or if the sensory systems are improperly functioning, an individual may experience lightheadedness or dizziness.

 

 

Fever

Fever, also known as pyrexia and febrile response, is defined as having a temperature above the normal range due to an increase in the body's temperature set-point. There is not a single agreed-upon upper limit for normal temperature with sources using values between 37.5 and 38.3 °C (99.5 and 100.9 °F). The increase in set-point triggers increased muscle contraction and causes a feeling of cold. This results in greater heat production and efforts to conserve heat. When the set-point temperature returns to normal, a person feels hot, becomes flushed, and may begin to sweat.[6] Rarely a fever may trigger a febrile seizure. This is more common in young children.[7] Fevers do not typically go higher than 41 to 42 °C (105.8 to 107.6 °F).

 

A fever can be caused by many medical conditions ranging from the not serious to potentially serious. This includes viral, bacterial and parasitic infections such as the common cold, urinary tract infections, meningitis, malaria and appendicitis among others. Non-infectious causes include vasculitis, deep vein thrombosis, side effects of medication, and cancer among others. It differs from hyperthermia, in that hyperthermia is an increase in body temperature over the temperature set-point, due to either too much heat production or not enough heat loss.

 

Treatment to reduce fever is generally not required. Treatment of associated pain and inflammation, however, may be useful and help a person rest. Medications such as ibuprofen or paracetamol may help with this as well as lower temperature. Measures such as putting a cool damp cloth on the forehead and having a slightly warm bath are not useful and may simply make a person more uncomfortable. Children younger than three months require medical attention, as might people with serious medical problems such as a compromised immune system or people with other symptoms. Hyperthermia does require treatment.

 

Fever is one of the most common medical signs. It is part of about 30% of healthcare visits by children and occurs in up to 75% of adults who are seriously sick. While fever is a useful defense mechanism, treating fever does not appear to worsen outcomes. Fever is viewed with greater concern by parents and healthcare professionals than it usually deserves, a phenomenon known as fever phobia.

 

Tightness in the chest

Chest pain may be a symptom of a number of serious disorders and is, in general, considered a medical emergency. Even though it may be determined that the pain is noncardiac in origin (does not come from a heart problem), this is often a diagnosis of exclusion made after ruling out more serious causes of the pain. Cardiac (heart-related) chest pain is called angina pectoris.

 

Chest pain is a common presenting problem, as the following numbers illustrate:

 

In the US, an estimated 5 million people per year present to the emergency department with chest pain.

More than 50% of people presenting to emergency facilities with unexplained chest pain will have coronary disease ruled out.

1.5 million people are admitted annually for workup of acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

Approximately 8 billion dollars are used annually to evaluate complaints of chest pain.

Children with chest pain account for 0.3% to 0.6% of pediatric emergency department visits

Twitching

  • Muscle contraction

  • Convulsion, rapid and repeated muscle contraction and relaxation

  • Fasciculation, a small, local, involuntary muscle contraction

  • Myoclonic twitch, a jerk usually caused by sudden muscle contractions

  • Myokymia, a continuous, involuntary muscle twitch that affects the muscles of the face

  • Spasm, a sudden, involuntary contraction

  • Tic, an involuntary, repetitive, nonrhythmic action

  • Tremor, an involuntary, repetitive, somewhat rhythmic action

 

Overdose Symptoms:

  • Loss of consciousness

  • Chest Pain

  • Reduced Pupils

  • Not alert

  • Heavy drowsiness

  • Weakness

  • Feeling faint

  • Irregular heartbeat

 

What are common street names fot Oxycodone used by drug dealers and users?

 

  • Common street names are:

  • Hookups

  • Momma Tears

  • Vike

  • Demmies

  • O.C.

  • Oxy

  • Percs

  • Octagons

  • Sizzurp

  • Captain Cody
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